punish


punish
pun|ish [ˈpʌnıʃ] v [T]
[Date: 1300-1400; : Old French; Origin: punir, from Latin punire, from poena; PAIN1]
1.) to make someone suffer because they have done something wrong or broken the law
→↑punishment, punitive ↑punitive
Smacking is not an acceptable way of punishing a child.
He promised to punish severely any officials found guilty of electoral fraud.
punish sb for (doing) sth
It's unfair to punish a whole class for the actions of one or two students.
They deserve to be punished for putting passengers at risk.
I felt I was being punished for what my mother had done.
punish sb by doing sth
My parents decided to punish me by withdrawing financial support.
punish sb with sth
The House voted to punish the senator with a formal reprimand.
2.) [usually passive]
if a crime is punished in a particular way, anyone who is guilty of it is made to suffer in that way
→↑punishment, punitive ↑punitive punish by/with
In some societies, theft is punished by death.
3.) punish yourself
to make yourself feel guilty or bad for something you have done
If you fail, don't punish yourself.

Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • punish — [pun′ish] vt. [ME punischen < extended stem of OFr punir < L punire, to punish < poena, punishment, penalty: see PENAL] 1. to cause to undergo pain, loss, or suffering for a crime or wrongdoing 2. to impose a penalty on a wrongdoer for… …   English World dictionary

  • Punish — Pun ish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Punished}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Punishing}.] [OE. punischen, F. punir, from L. punire, punitum, akin to poena punishment, penalty. See {Pain}, and { ish}.] 1. To impose a penalty upon; to afflict with pain, loss, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • punish — pun·ish / pə nish/ vt 1: to impose a penalty on for a fault, offense, or violation 2: to inflict a penalty for the commission of (an offense) in retribution or retaliation or as a deterrent vi: to inflict punishment pun·ish·abil·i·ty /ˌpə ni shə… …   Law dictionary

  • punish — punish, chastise, castigate, chasten, discipline, correct mean to inflict pain, loss, or suffering upon a person for his sin, crime, or fault. Punish implies imposing a penalty for violation of law, disobedience of authority, or intentional… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • punish — mid 14c., from O.Fr. puniss , extended prp. stem of punir to punish, from L. punire inflict a penalty on, cause pain for some offense, earlier poenire, from poena penalty, punishment (see PENAL (Cf. penal)). Colloquial meaning to inflict heavy… …   Etymology dictionary

  • punish — [v] penalize for wrongdoing abuse, attend to, batter, beat, beat up, blacklist, castigate, chasten, chastise, correct, crack down on*, cuff, debar, defrock, discipline, dismiss, do in, execute, exile, expel, fine, flog, give a going over*, give… …   New thesaurus

  • punish — ► VERB 1) impose a penalty on (someone) for an offence. 2) impose a penalty on someone for (an offence). 3) treat harshly or unfairly. DERIVATIVES punishable adjective. ORIGIN Latin punire, from poena penalty …   English terms dictionary

  • punish — [[t]pʌ̱nɪʃ[/t]] punishes, punishing, punished 1) VERB To punish someone means to make them suffer in some way because they have done something wrong. [V n] I don t believe that George ever had to punish the children... [V n] According to present… …   English dictionary

  • punish — punisher, n. /pun ish/, v.t. 1. to subject to pain, loss, confinement, death, etc., as a penalty for some offense, transgression, or fault: to punish a criminal. 2. to inflict a penalty for (an offense, fault, etc.): to punish theft. 3. to handle …   Universalium

  • punish */*/ — UK [ˈpʌnɪʃ] / US verb [transitive, often passive] Word forms punish : present tense I/you/we/they punish he/she/it punishes present participle punishing past tense punished past participle punished to make someone suffer because they have done… …   English dictionary